Monthly Archives: May 2017

National Three Peak Challenge 

The National Three Peaks Challenge is an event in which participants attempt to climb the highest mountains of England, Scotland and Wales within 24 hours. It is frequently used to raise money for charitable organisations. Walkers climb each peak in turn, and are driven from the foot of one mountain to the next. The three peaks are:

Ben Nevis / Beinn Nibheis (1,344 m or 4,409 ft), the highest mountain in Scotland


Scafell Pike (978 m or 3,209 ft), the highest mountain in England


Snowdon / Yr Wyddfa (1,085 m or 3,560 ft), the highest mountain in Wales

The total distance walked is estimated at 42 kilometres (26 mi) or 44 km (27 mi), with a total ascent of 9,800 feet (3,000 m).

Team Evo are taking this on in aid of the Derbyshire and Yorkshire Air Ambulances. The trick is to complete the climbs in 11 hours and that leaves 13 hours for the drive. That makes drivers as important as hikers.

Team Evo has been training hard all year for this event with many hills climbed, 10ks and half marathons run and lots of sitting down which will happen a lot in between the three mountains.


Team Evo planning meeting 
Ronald Turnbull argues that it makes sense to tackle the summits from north to south, starting at Ben Nevis in the evening, and ending at Snowdon the following day.  This is because the descent of Ben Nevis is the easiest of the three to do in fading light, particularly the lower section below Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe (“Half-Way Lochan”), and because the night can be used for driving down the A74(M) and M74 motorways to Scafell Pike.  This then entails climbing Scafell Pike early the following morning and driving to Snowdonia for the early afternoon, in order to climb Snowdon and descend again by the evening.  Scafell Pike can be climbed either from the north side starting at Seathwaite (Borrowdale) or from the south side, starting at Wasdale Head. The Wasdale approach is a longer drive but provides a shorter walk. Snowdon is climbed from Pen-y-Pass, although an alternative descent leads to Llanberis, and takes an additional 15 minutes.

Each mountain is expected to take up to 5 hours to climb and descend for a “standard strong walker”, and a total driving time of 10 hours allows an average speed of 65 miles per hour (105 km/h) on motorways and 50–55 mph (80–89 km/h) on trunk roads and occasional comfort breaks and fuel stops.

Variations of the basic format have also been achieved, such as replacing the driving sections with the use of public transport, or sailing between the three peaks across the Irish Sea.

Please give generously if you can

Just giving page

National Three Peaks Challenge Charities 

Just giving page Team Evo three Peaks
The Yorkshire and Derbyshire air ambulances are the reason we are taking to the mountains. Here’s a little information about the work they do and how they are funded (by people like you and me).


We could need them at any time and  as a team we have benefitted already from them saving the lives of our family and friends. 


A SERVICE THAT PROVIDES 

STATE-OF-THE-ART EMERGENCY CARE

The Charity was set up in 2000 and with the addition of the second Air Ambulance in October 2007, we were the first Air Ambulance in the UK to own and operate a Dedicated Air Desk in the UK. With the addition of the Air Ways Communication Systems, the Yorkshire Air Ambulance has developed into a sophisticated emergency service that provides state-of-the-art emergency medical care throughout Yorkshire.

The swift medical interventions provided by our Air Ambulance crews have a major impact on a patient’s chance of survival and subsequent quality of life.

Yorkshire has a vast topography that not only includes remote, rural and densely populated areas but also includes major motorways and road networks such as the M62, M1, A1 and M18. 

The fast medical response that the Air Ambulance service provides is vital to a patient who has received major trauma, especially those with head and spinal injuries, as the Air Ambulance can avoid traffic congestion and uneven road surfaces.


On average, when a patient has been received by the YAA, they will always be only 10 minutes from the nearest hospital and 15 minutes from the most relevant treatment centre. In some cases, this can save people’s lives.

Both of Yorkshire’s Air Ambulances are Airbus H145’s, G-YAAC and G-YOAA. They’re each equipped with state-of-the-art medical and helicopter specifications. Both helicopters can reach speeds of up to 160 mph and together cover the whole of the region seven days a week, 365 days a year.