Monthly Archives: September 2015

TIPS AND TRICKS TO TACKLE THE YORKSHIRE THREE PEAKSPosted on: April 24th, 2014 by Lost Earth Adventures

TRAINING TIPS AND ADVICE FOR COMPLETING THE YORKSHIRE 3 PEAKS CHALLENGE

(we found this really informative blog on line)

Congratulations on taking on the Yorkshire 3 Peaks Challenge! This is no mean feat and preparing in advance for the big day can make all the difference during the challenge. Here are a few tips and tricks for maximising your success in the mountains.

Walking down Pen Y Ghent

KIT AND PERSONAL EQUIPMENT

These Boots Were Made for Walking

  

  
One of the greatest determining factors in your overall enjoyment and success on the Y3P is your choice of footwear. It is essential that you have the best footwear available – trainers just won’t do! Poorly fitted footwear can lead to blisters which are no fun at all whether you’re on mile 2 or 20 of this trek.

Walking BootsThe first time you wear your boots should not be on this trek. Make sure you wear them in well beforehand and walk in them as much as possible. To the supermarket, running errands, around the house, this all helps. But the best way to work your boots in, is to wear them walking on variable terrain, preferably off-road and up and down hills.

Breaking your boots in makes you aware of hot spots, areas that are prone to irritation and blisters. This will allow you to find a solution that works best for you. Some swear by talcum powder and blister pads, others wear two pairs of socks (a thin inner sock and thicker outer sock). Either way, you’ll know how to treat’em before the challenge.

Socks

Find a good, breathable pair of trekking/walking socks and bring a few spare with you on the day. Make sure they fit nicely with the boots you’re planning on wearing during the challenge.

  
Pack Light, But Pack for All Weather Scenarios
Remember, you will be carrying your bag for over 5200 feet of ascent, across 3 peaks, over a distance of 24.5 miles. That extra item you thought was “essential” might not seem like it when you’re ascending Whernside.

When packing your rucksack put items that are frequently used at the top of your bag so they’re easily accessible, during the trek.

Divide your water into 2 smaller bottles to evenly distribute the weight in your bag. Alternatively a Camel Back or similar water bladder system is perfect for this challenge.

Weather forecasting stoneRain, snow, sleet, wind… and sunshine can all occur in the space of a few minutes in the Yorkshire Dales. Don’t come ill prepared make sure you bring clothing that can accommodate all weather in the hill.

  

 
And Finally

You’ll be much happier and comfortable if the kit you have fits you well. You’ll also spend less time fiddling with it, and more time enjoying the beautiful scenery… try before you buy!

FITNESS

The Yorkshire 3 Peaks Challenge is a true test of endurance and ‘mountain fitness’. Training beforehand will give you the upper hand. Improving your general overall fitness levels with cardio and strength training is a good place to start.

Start Slowly, Increase Slowly

A beginner’s mistake is doing too much too soon. Slowly increasing your intensity over time is the key to injury free pre-training. It’s also recommended to consult your physician before you undertake any physical activity and training program.

  
Strength Training

Walking towards WhernsideFocus on strengthening your quads, calves and core. Squats work wonders for the quads, while heal lifts are great for the calves. Planks are perfect for giving an overall core strength workout.

Do these a few times a week, alternating strength training and cardio.

Take the stairs! Walking up hills can’t be replicated by walking on flat terrain; your quads and calves will thank you every step of the way! 

Cardio

A few times a week undertake activities that will raise your heart rate, which will increase your overall fitness.

3-4 months beforehand:

30-90 minutes of constant physical activity, 2-3 times a week.

Lower mileage walks

Happy hikers on Whernside1-2 months beforehand:

60-90 minutes of constant physical activity, 3 times per week – this can be mixed between swimming, running, biking or similar activity.

Walks 8-15 miles trying for these distances once a week, increasing your distance as you progress. Increase your distance, and climb and descend as many hills as you can, over variable terrain.

If you’re in a group, go for a training walk together, this will also help to motivate each other and create a great team dynamic.

Head for the Hills

The best training tip we can give for undertaking a high endurance challenge in the mountains is to get out in the mountains!

Find as many hills as you can and get out with your rucksack on your back as much as you can. If there is the opportunity trying out one of the individual peaks or similar beforehand will give you a great flavour for the challenge ahead.

The Yorkshire DalesFood and Drink

As you increase your mileage, endurance and training intensity food and drink become ever more so important. When you’re in the hills, the best advice we can give is to eat, drink and rest little, but often. Foods that you can snack on, provide high energy and easily digest are recommended.

 

 

And Finally…
Have fun, stop and smell the roses, snap photos, take in the views and enjoy yourself!

Tips for getting good sleep 

These tips for getting good sleep are courtesy of sleepfoundation.org take a look at their site for a wealth of information. 

  
Healthy sleep habits can make a big difference in your quality of life. Having healthy sleep habits is often referred to as having good “sleep hygiene.” 

Try to keep the following sleep practices on a consistent basis:

Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends. This helps to regulate your body’s clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night.

 

Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. A relaxing, routine activity right before bedtime conducted away from bright lights helps separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety which can make it more difficult to fall asleep, get sound and deep sleep or remain asleep.
If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon. Power napping may help you get through the day, but if you find that you can’t fall asleep at bedtime, eliminating even short catnaps may help.

  

Exercise daily. Vigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity. Exercise at any time of day, but not at the expense of your sleep.
Evaluate your room. Design your sleep environment to establish the conditions you need for sleep. Your bedroom should be cool – between 60 and 67 degrees. Your bedroom should also be free from any noise that can disturb your sleep. Finally, your bedroom should be free from any light. Check your room for noises or other distractions. This includes a bed partner’s sleep disruptions such as snoring. Consider using blackout curtains, eye shades, ear plugs, “white noise” machines, humidifiers, fans and other devices.
Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows. Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The one you have been using for years may have exceeded its life expectancy – about 9 or 10 years for most good quality mattresses. Have comfortable pillows and make the room attractive and inviting for sleep but also free of allergens that might affect you and objects that might cause you to slip or fall if you have to get up during the night.
Use bright light to help manage your circadian rhythms. Avoid bright light in the evening and expose yourself to sunlight in the morning. This will keep your circadian rhythms in check.
Avoid alcohol, cigarettes, and heavy meals in the evening. Alcohol, cigarettes and caffeine can disrupt sleep. Eating big or spicy meals can cause discomfort from indigestion that can make it hard to sleep. If you can, avoid eating large meals for two to three hours before bedtime. Try a light snack 45 minutes before bed if you’re still hungry. 
Wind down. Your body needs time to shift into sleep mode, so spend the last hour before bed doing a calming activity such as reading. For some people, using an electronic device such as a laptop can make it hard to fall asleep, because the particular type of light emanating from the screens of these devices is activating to the brain. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid electronics before bed or in the middle of the night.

 

If you can’t sleep, go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired. It is best to take work materials, computers and televisions out of the sleeping environment. Use your bed only for sleep and sex to strengthen the association between bed and sleep. If you associate a particular activity or item with anxiety about sleeping, omit it from your bedtime routine.